Keeping Canadian communications cutting edge

Keeping Canadian communications cutting edge

University of Manitoba team perfects the science of satellite communications with industry partners
February 3, 2012

Canada’s Information and Technology industry brings in revenues of more than $137.6 billion to the Canadian economy, and to remain cutting edge, it relies on innovations from some of the country’s most advanced research labs, such as the University of Manitoba’s Applied Electromagnetics Lab. Norsat, a Vancouver communications company that employs some 170 people, for example, is successfully marketing miniature satellite antennas for video conferencing and secure communications from the mobile locations. 

The U of M research team has been instrumental in advancing the connectivity and miniaturization of antennas, which, among other things, has helped modernize cell phones and greatly decreased the size of satellite dishes. The team works with a number of industry partners, from aerospace and defense to communications and utilities. Among other projects, the team has worked with the Canadian Space Agency to build polar satellites to improve communications and monitor Arctic sovereignty; with Manitoba Hydro to create sensors for monitoring bridges, roads and other structures; and with National Defence to build antennas that can disable land mines.